neurosciencenews
neurosciencenews:

What Songbirds Tell Us About How We Learn
Read the full article What Songbirds Tell Us About How We Learn at NeuroscienceNews.com.
McGill researcher pinpoints an important role of the basal ganglia in vocal learning across species.
When you throw a wild pitch or sing a flat note, it could be that your basal ganglia made you do it. This area in the middle of the brain is involved in motor control and learning. And one reason for that errant toss or off-key note may be that your brain prompted you to vary your behavior to help you learn, from trial-and-error, to perform better.
The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)
Research: “Emergence of Context-Dependent Variability across a Basal Ganglia Network” by Sarah C. Woolley, Raghav Rajan, Mati Joshua, and Allison J. Doupe in Neuron. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2014.01.039
Image: The basal ganglia is dramatically affected in illnesses such as Parkinson’s and Huntington disease. The findings may eventually be relevant to understanding changes to learning and flexibility in movement that occur in those diseases. This image shows the basal ganglia with specific areas labeled. The image is for illustrative purposes only and is not connected to the research. Credit BruceBlaus.

neurosciencenews:

What Songbirds Tell Us About How We Learn

Read the full article What Songbirds Tell Us About How We Learn at NeuroscienceNews.com.

McGill researcher pinpoints an important role of the basal ganglia in vocal learning across species.

When you throw a wild pitch or sing a flat note, it could be that your basal ganglia made you do it. This area in the middle of the brain is involved in motor control and learning. And one reason for that errant toss or off-key note may be that your brain prompted you to vary your behavior to help you learn, from trial-and-error, to perform better.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

Research: “Emergence of Context-Dependent Variability across a Basal Ganglia Network” by Sarah C. Woolley, Raghav Rajan, Mati Joshua, and Allison J. Doupe in Neuron. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2014.01.039

Image: The basal ganglia is dramatically affected in illnesses such as Parkinson’s and Huntington disease. The findings may eventually be relevant to understanding changes to learning and flexibility in movement that occur in those diseases. This image shows the basal ganglia with specific areas labeled. The image is for illustrative purposes only and is not connected to the research. Credit BruceBlaus.

prostheticknowledge

prostheticknowledge:

Apple Patents for Automatic 3D Avatar Creation and Emotional States

Something to expect in the future in regards to online identity (both of which were filed today):

A three-dimensional (“3D”) avatar can be automatically created that resembles the physical appearance of an individual captured in one or more input images or video frames. The avatar can be further customized by the individual in an editing environment and used in various applications, including but not limited to gaming, social networking and video conferencing.

I wonder if this will be connected to Apple’s purchase of depth sensor company Primesense [Link to patent file]

Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for creating and using customized avatar instances to reflect current user states are disclosed. In various implementations, the user states can be defines using trigger events based on user-entered textual data, emoticons, or states of the device being used. For each user state, a customized avatar instance having a facial expression, body language, accessories, clothing items, and/or a presentation scheme reflective of the user state can be generated.

[Link to patent file]